Personal Learning Environments: Diversity and Divide

This year I am going to attend the Alpine Rendez‐Vous 2013 for the first time. The ARV13 takes place from January, 28 till  February, 1st in Villard‐de‐Lans, Vercors, in the French Alps.  As the ARVR13 homepage says:

The Alpine Rendez‐Vous (ARV) is a now well established atypical scientific event focused on Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL). (…) One main goal of the Alpine Rendez‐Vous is to bring together researchers from the different scientific communities doing research on Technology‐Enhanced Learning, in a largely informal setting, away from their workplace routines.

This is what I am really looking for – getting away for some time from the daily work and be able to discuss a myriad of fascinating topics with great researchers!

During the first three days I am going to participate in two workshops:

Here is just an abstract of the position paper Graham Attwell and me submitted for Workshop 5: TEL, the Crisis and the Response, which is hosted by Prof. John Traxler.

Crisi-tunity

 危机 – wēijī is the Chinese word for “crisis”. It comprises the symbols 危 wēi (danger) and 机 jī (opportunity)

Abstract

In this position paper, we discuss whether current TEL promotes diversity or divide and the current barriers in promoting diversity in TEL. We discuss these issues based on the example of Personal Learning Environments (PLE), which is as an approach to TEL aiming at empowering learners to use diverse technological tools suited to their own needs and connecting with other learners through building Personal Learning Networks. We argue that this approach to TEL promotes diversity through boundary-crossing and responding to the diverse needs and prerequisites that each individual learner brings in. At the same time we discuss how the PLE approach challenges current educational practices and what tensions arise when Personal Learning Environments are implemented in educational institutions.

You can read more here:

Diversity and Divide in TEL: The case for Personal Learning Environments.

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